The Verb of God Made Flesh: Jesus, Love and Learning in a Post-Covid Church

Bishop Edward King Chapel

Some decades ago, I was engaged in ordination training for the Church of England. I still am, of course. Our training never ends. Like conversion to Christianity, it is not a date marked in the past, but rather perpetual work-in-progress: for we never finish being converted. Ever. As part of my ordination training, I was despatched on placement to a remote rural parish, where one day I found myself being assessed on my skills leading a Bible Study. I recall a group of curious and engaged laity, trying to grapple with the text I had set them, and the discussion I was leading – at the same time as marking me for my effort and expertise, and also trying to find the whole exercise vaguely educational and devotional.

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Prosperity and Social Flourishing Post-Brexit

Bishop Edward King Chapel

Some years ago, a Professor of Psychology at the University of Louvain took an interest in how people feasted and celebrated. As part of his research, he asked one of his students to write a thesis on the following subject: ‘how do children, from the ages of 9-11 years of age, experience the phenomenon of feast?’.  The student approached the subject in a number of ways, and one of these consisted of showing a controlled group of 100 children three drawings of a different birthday feast.

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“Boats Against the Current”: Gatsby Forty Years On

Bishop Edward King Chapel

I am not quite sure what my old English Literature teacher, Bruce Ritchie, would have made of this short article.  I count myself blessed to have been taught by him at A-level, and having grown up in a house that was not especially into books or English literature (that is some understatement), it was no mean feat of his to inspire our class of somewhat lazy, precocious late-adolescents to read.  And then to begin to love reading. Here, I do mean ‘love’.  I have never stopped since.

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Vicarious Lalochezia? (Preparing for Lent)

Bishop Edward King Chapel

Anyone over the age of 45 is likely to have some memory of July 2nd 1985.  This was Live Aid – sometimes billed as the ‘global jukebox’.  Also known as the ‘Woodstock of the Eighties’, the world’s biggest rock festival was organised by Boomtown Rats singer Bob Geldof to raise money for famine relief in Africa.  Elton John, Paul McCartney, David Bowie, the Beach Boys, Mick Jagger, Queen, Wham and Dire Straits all played. As did the Beach Boys, Bob Dylan, Duran Duran and Paul Simon.

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